Receiving a letter from the IRS can be a startling experience, especially when it concerns an audit. Since the IRS only sends a small percentage of tax filers an audit letter, people aren’t always sure what to look for. Scammers count on that fact to catch people off guard and scare them into becoming a victim. But if the letter is real and the IRS plans to audit you, it’s important to identify whether or not you need to take action. 

How to Know if the Audit Letter is Real 

The letter will begin with something like, “Your (state or federal) income tax return for the year shown above has been selected for examination.” And it will also contain the following information: 

  • Your name
  • Taxpayer ID 
  • Form Number
  • Employee ID Number
  • Contact Information 

The IRS will never ask you to provide the material listed above, and that is an easy way to pick out a scam. Also, this letter will inform you of the primary focus of the audit and what financial documentation you’ll need to resolve the issue. In addition to that, they’ll clearly identify what documents they’re requesting, they’ll provide details about your meeting such as length or who can attend, and they’ll inform you of what will happen if you don’t respond.

Take a look at our sample IRS audit letter here.

How will the IRS notify you? 

The IRS audit letter will come to you by certified mail. They will never call or email you to notify you about an audit. Scammers will do both and put intense pressure on victims to give over their personal information or even make direct payments. If you’re unsure about a possible audit situation, contact your local IRS office or a tax professional at Wiggam & Geer for assistance. 

Possible triggers for receiving an audit letter include

  • Failure to properly report income
  • Large numbers of itemized deductions can look suspicious
  • If business deductions are claimed as personal deductions & vice versa
  • If your lifestyle seems out of reach for your reported income
  • Unreported foreign accounts
  • If you claim children who aren’t your dependents

Have Questions? Call the Experienced Tax Attorneys at Wiggam & Geer 

If you’ve received an audit letter from the IRS, we can help. The experienced attorneys at Wiggam & Geer can evaluate the situation, recommend a course of action, and assist you in dealing with the IRS or the Georgia DOR. Contact metro Atlanta’s top tax and bankruptcy attorneys by clicking here or giving us a call at (404) 609-1300.